News & Views

Press Releases

Who Takes Care of Whom? Surprising New Evidence

New Study from Population and Development Review Finds Rising Need, Reassurances

NEW YORK (29 June 2015) — There has been much recent discussion in the press of the plight of the so-called “sandwich generation,” that is, adults who are responsible for the care of children as well as aging parents. The need for simultaneous childcare and eldercare is a reality that can limit families’—particularly women’s—opportunities for paying work.

A new study by social scientists Emilio Zagheni and Denys Dukhovnov for the first time drills down into US statistics about who is providing this care, and who is receiving it. The study found that in 2012, adults in the United States provided more than a billion hours of unpaid caregiving every week—equal to the work of 30.5 million full-time caregivers. The researchers project a rise in the need for such care, reveal some surprises about who is providing care, and provide some reassurances about the future. The study appears in the June 2015 issue of Population and Development Review, a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal published by the Population Council.

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Council Commentary

Investing in Young People in Egypt

Investing in Young People in Egypt

For decades, the Population Council has generated evidence about the lives of young people in Egypt. In 1997, we fielded the groundbreaking Adolescence and Social Change in Egypt survey, which interviewed more than 9,000 young people. In 2009, we built on that foundation with the Survey of Young People in Egypt (SYPE). Council interviewers spoke to a nationally representative sample of around 15,000 young people between the ages of 10 and 29 from 11,000 households—one of the largest surveys of young people in the Middle East and North Africa.

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From Our Partners

Improving Girls’ Lives—What Works Best

This post is part of a blog series on evidence generated through the Population Council’s RISING program. RISING uses implementation science, evidence review, and organizational grants to build knowledge about what works in adolescent girls programming. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Population Council. Please direct any questions to Jeffrey Edmeades.

Recent studies have shown that girl-focused programs can be very effective in expanding girls’ ability to make strategic life choices by providing them with access to critical resources. Understanding what type of programs or program components work best in addressing the unique needs and challenges adolescent girls face is the focus of the RISING program. Making girl-centered programming more effective through rigorous examination of which programs have the greatest impact in improving the lives of girls worldwide will provide critically important guidance for programmers going forward.

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State of the World’s Mothers

“Lifesaving health care may be only a stone’s throw away, but the poorest mothers and children often cannot get the care they need.”

Just in time for Mother’s Day, Save the Children has published State of the World’s Mothers 2015. The report spotlights the massive health disparities between wealthy and poor women living in cities.

And learn more about Population Council’s decades of work to improve the health and lives of mothers around the globe.

Press Releases

Global Investment, Health Experts Join Population Council Board of Trustees

The Population Council announces the appointment of two board members, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, Robert Harding Inaugural Chair in Global Child Health at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, and founding director of the Center for Excellence in Women and Child Health at the Aga Khan University, Karachi; and Darcy Bradbury, managing director of the D. E. Shaw group. Bhutta and Bradbury will assume their roles on July 1, 2015.

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Population Briefs

Making Sexuality and HIV Education Programs More Effective

Making Sexuality and HIV Education Programs More Effective
Photo credit: Population Council

A new analysis by Population Council researcher Nicole Haberland provides powerful evidence that sexuality and HIV education programs addressing gender and power in intimate relationships are far more likely to be effective than programs that do not. The research appears in the March 2015 issue of International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, published by the Guttmacher Institute.

Adolescents in the United States and around the world face significant reproductive health challenges, including high rates of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, young people in the United States aged 15–24 account for half of all new sexually transmitted infections. Globally, young people in this age range account for 40 percent of all new HIV infections, according to UNAIDS.

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