News & Views

Call for Nominations: Olivia Schieffelin Nordberg Award

Nomination Deadline: 10 December 2015

The Olivia Schieffelin Nordberg Award for Excellence in Writing and Editing in the Population Sciences was created by her colleagues, friends, and family to commemorate Olivia Schieffelin Nordberg (1942–1996), who played a leading role in information dissemination on international population issues over three decades as an editor, writer, and director of publications.

The $5,000 award, given every two years, is conferred at a reception at the Population Council. The recipient is invited to make a brief substantive presentation on a topic of his or her choosing. The next award will be given in the spring of 2016.

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Press Releases

Population Council Hosts Second Annual Ideas with Impact Awards

Population Council Hosts Second Annual Ideas with Impact Awards

The Population Council hosted the second annual Ideas with Impact Awards ceremony in New York City on Tuesday night, 6 October 2015. The evening celebrated the achievements of some of the most influential leaders in global health and international development.

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Press Releases

Population Council Research Featured at First Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, 18–21 October in Mexico City

Council Studies Advance Global Efforts to Keep Women and Children Healthy and Safe

Population Council researchers will present the latest data on access to life-saving innovations and drugs that reduce preventable maternal and newborn deaths, barriers to facility-based childbirth, and the validity of self-reporting maternal and newborn health care indicators at the premiere Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, 18–21 October in Mexico City.

Convened by the Mexican Secretariat of Health and partners including USAID, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, UNFPA, UNICEF, and others, the conference advances technical knowledge and showcases innovative solutions to improving maternal and newborn health within the post-2015 development framework. Attendees, including technical implementers, policymakers, researchers, and practitioners, come from more than 50 countries. 

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Amy Ong Tsui Named President-Elect of Population Association of America

The Population Association of America (PAA) has named Amy Ong Tsui—Population Council trustee, Johns Hopkins University professor, and Gates Institute senior scholar—its president-elect. She will replace current PAA president Steven Ruggles on January 1, 2016.

PAA is a nonprofit, scientific, professional organization established to promote the improvement, advancement, and progress of the human race through research on problems related to human population. It has more than 3,000 members.

Tsui is a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and a senior scholar at the Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health in Baltimore, Maryland. She has been a member of the Population Council’s board of trustees since 2014.

From Our Partners

Using Data to Describe Why Schoolgirls Get Pregnant

Earlier this year, Population Council researcher Stephanie Psaki asked, “Does getting pregnant cause girls to drop out of school?” The question has far-reaching implications for international development interventions for adolescent girls. In a new Devex commentary, Audrey Anderson of Plan International USA describes a digital data collection initiative in two districts in Indonesia to prepare for a Plan International program addressing adolescent reproductive health and life skills. Using “Girl Roster,” a digital mapping tool developed by the Population Council, Anderson found different reasons for adolescent pregnancy in the two districts, illustrating the need for interventions that are tailored to the needs of girls in different contexts.

Council Commentary

Population Council Mourns the Death of Family Planning Researcher Tapani Luukkainen

University of Helsinki researcher Tapani Luukkainen, who led the development of Mirena®, the highly effective levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (IUS) died on Monday, September 21. He was 86 years old.

Mirena was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2000 for contraception and later for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding.

As a member of the Council’s International Committee for Contraception Research, Dr. Luukkainen also pioneered research to identify innovative contraceptive methods for men and women and strengthened the capacity of clinical research centers in developed and developing countries. He was a giant in the field of contraceptive R&D, a patient yet demanding mentor to many young professionals, and an inspiration for those who hope to make a difference in women's lives through their vision and the quality of their work.

“The Population Council honors Dr. Luukkainen’s contributions to improving the health of women around the world,” said John Townsend, vice president and director of the Population Council’s Reproductive Health program. “We join with the reproductive health and family planning communities in celebrating his accomplishments and mourning his passing.”

Ideas with Impact

Developing Highly Effective, Long-Acting, and Reversible Contraceptives

As a senior medical advisor for Planned Parenthood Federation of America and a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University, I know well the power that family planning can provide for women and couples. With effective contraception that meets their needs and lifestyles, women have the ability to freely decide whether to have children and, if so, when and how many.

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From Our Partners

Engaging Adolescents, Parents, and the Community to Change Inequitable Gender Norms in Rural Nepal

This post is part of a blog series on evidence generated through the Population Council’s RISING program. RISING uses implementation science, evidence review, and organizational grants to build knowledge about what works in adolescent girls programming. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Population Council. Please direct any questions to Brad Kerner.

In Nepal, Save the Children and Georgetown University’s Institute for Reproductive Health (IRH) are piloting and evaluating a package of programs called CHOICES, VOICES, and PROMISES that seek to challenge and change restrictive gender norms among very young adolescents by intervening at the levels of the individual, the family, and the community. The programs were developed by Save the Children in Nepal, where there are high rates of early marriage and gender based violence.

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Ideas with Impact

Delivering Ideas, Evidence, and Solutions to Improve Lives

Since 1952, the Population Council has been changing the way the world thinks about critical health and development issues. Our biomedical, social science, and public health research in more than 50 countries tests ideas, generates evidence, and delivers solutions leading to more effective policies, programs, and technologies that improve lives around the world.

The Council has a rich history. For more than 60 years, our data have driven decisionmaking. From the start we have given voice and visibility to the world’s most vulnerable people. We increase awareness of the problems they face and offer evidence-based solutions. Around the world, governments, civil society organizations, and international agencies seek our help to understand and overcome obstacles to improving health and promoting development. And we work with partners on every continent to use state-of-the-art biomedical science to develop new contraceptives and products to prevent the transmission of HIV

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