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Press Releases

New Research from the Population Council Shows Child Marriage Can Be Delayed

New Research from the Population Council Shows Child Marriage Can Be Delayed

Researchers Share Findings and Recommendations for Ending Child Marriage in Sub-Saharan Africa

WASHINGTON, DC (12 August 2015) — Today the Population Council released new evidence on what works to delay the age of marriage for extremely vulnerable girls in sub-Saharan Africa. Researchers also shared rarely available data on the cost of interventions that were tested, and issued recommendations for policymakers, donors, and organizations concerned about child marriage.

Each year, more than 14 million girls around the world get married before the age of 18. In sub-Saharan Africa, more than 1 in 10 girls are married before the age of 15. Four in ten are married before the age of 18. In some “hotspots,” such as the areas in which the Population Council’s study was conducted, prevalence of child marriage is even higher.

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Press Releases

Results from New Study of Council’s Investigational One Year Ring Published in PLOS ONE

NEW YORK (12 August 2015)—A study published today in PLOS ONE assessed effects of the Population Council’s investigational one-year reusable contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR) on the incidence of vaginal infections and vaginal microflora. The study demonstrated that use of the CVR for up to 13 cycles presented no increased risk of infection, nor did it disrupt the balance of microbes in the vagina.

The one-year reusable CVR contains Nestorone® and ethinyl estradiol. Nestorone (NES) is an investigational progestin that has been shown in clinical studies to prevent ovulation and pregnancy. Ethinyl estradiol (EE) is an approved, marketed, synthetic version of the female hormone estrogen.

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Council Commentary

Creating Effective Responses to SGBV

Creating Effective Responses to SGBV

Most sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) programs in East and Southern Africa focus on preventing violence. Fewer focus on meeting the needs of survivors.

The Council leads an innovative network that is creating effective, comprehensive responses to SGBV that bridge the medical, legal, and social-service sectors. A new open-access supplement from BMC Proceedings compiles findings from the Africa Regional SGBV Network's 7 years of innovative research and programming, providing evidence and insights about effective interventions for SGBV survivors in East and Southern Africa and highlighting the ways the network has influenced policy and practice in the region.

Press Releases

Population Council Research on Key Populations, Innovative Treatment and Prevention Models to Be Featured at IAS 2015

IAS 2015, the 8th Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, is the largest global scientific conference on HIV/AIDS

Population Council experts will present research on HIV treatment adherence among young people and risk among adolescent girls and people with disabilities; the impact of health systems strengthening and task-shifting on HIV prevalence and care; and efforts to increase access to quality HIV services for men who have sex with men at the International AIDS Society Conference, to be held 19–22 July in Vancouver, Canada. With 6,000 HIV professionals in attendance, it is the largest global scientific conference on HIV/AIDS.

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Press Releases

Who Takes Care of Whom? Surprising New Evidence

New Study from Population and Development Review Finds Rising Need, Reassurances

NEW YORK (29 June 2015) — There has been much recent discussion in the press of the plight of the so-called “sandwich generation,” that is, adults who are responsible for the care of children as well as aging parents. The need for simultaneous childcare and eldercare is a reality that can limit families’—particularly women’s—opportunities for paying work.

A new study by social scientists Emilio Zagheni and Denys Dukhovnov for the first time drills down into US statistics about who is providing this care, and who is receiving it. The study found that in 2012, adults in the United States provided more than a billion hours of unpaid caregiving every week—equal to the work of 30.5 million full-time caregivers. The researchers project a rise in the need for such care, reveal some surprises about who is providing care, and provide some reassurances about the future. The study appears in the June 2015 issue of Population and Development Review, a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal published by the Population Council.

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Council Commentary

Investing in Young People in Egypt

Investing in Young People in Egypt

For decades, the Population Council has generated evidence about the lives of young people in Egypt. In 1997, we fielded the groundbreaking Adolescence and Social Change in Egypt survey, which interviewed more than 9,000 young people. In 2009, we built on that foundation with the Survey of Young People in Egypt (SYPE). Council interviewers spoke to a nationally representative sample of around 15,000 young people between the ages of 10 and 29 from 11,000 households—one of the largest surveys of young people in the Middle East and North Africa.

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From Our Partners

Improving Girls’ Lives—What Works Best

This post is part of a blog series on evidence generated through the Population Council’s RISING program. RISING uses implementation science, evidence review, and organizational grants to build knowledge about what works in adolescent girls programming. The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Population Council. Please direct any questions to Jeffrey Edmeades.

Recent studies have shown that girl-focused programs can be very effective in expanding girls’ ability to make strategic life choices by providing them with access to critical resources. Understanding what type of programs or program components work best in addressing the unique needs and challenges adolescent girls face is the focus of the RISING program. Making girl-centered programming more effective through rigorous examination of which programs have the greatest impact in improving the lives of girls worldwide will provide critically important guidance for programmers going forward.

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