News & Views

Media Coverage

Can Teaching Kenyan Girls to Save Money Also Save Them from HIV?

Can Teaching Kenyan Girls to Save Money Also Save Them from HIV?

PBS NewsHour covers a Council program in Kenya that gives girls in Nairobi slums the tools they need to lead healthier, more productive lives. The Safe and Smart Savings program has already reached more than 11,000 adolescents in Kenya and is being expanded to an additional 8,000.

Media Coverage

“Passion Is Our Fuel but Not Our Plan”

"Why are we so slow to see, count, or reach the 200 million poorest girls?" asks Council expert Judith Bruce in "The adolescent girl moment: Passion is our fuel but not our plan," on Girls' Globe.

In a guest commentary published today, Bruce urges the global community to invest in targeted, evidence-based, scalable programs for real girls in real places. Improving the health, economic, and cognitive assets of adolescent girls will bring measurable, lasting change and guarantee the well-being and economic preparedness of the next generation.

Media Coverage

Ending Child Marriage

A new Time magazine article on the US–Africa Leaders Summit highlights the human rights violation that is child marriage, as well as solutions and players working to stop it, including the Population Council.

The Council’s Berhane Hewan project, which significantly reduced child marriage and increased schooling among enrolled girls aged 10–14, was discussed at a Summit side event on ending child marriage hosted by the International Center for Research on Women along with Human Rights Watch and the International Women's Health Coalition. 

Media Coverage

Displaced by Climate Change in Bangladesh

Rising sea levels due to climate change will displace millions of people over the next century. Considered one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change due to multiple factors—including population density, poverty, and topography—Bangladesh offers a preview of a hotter, crowded world forced to deal with climate disruption. A new article in Foreign Policy by Kenneth Weiss describes the country’s struggle.

Media Coverage

Female Health Workers Boost Family Planning in Bangladesh

In Matlab, Bangladesh in the 1970s, an experiment that used female community health workers to provide doorstep delivery of family planning services led to dramatic improvements in maternal and child health, increased contraceptive use, and a rapid decline in fertility. The program was so successful that it was expanded across the country, with extensive technical assistance and support from the Population Council.

"Matlab showed us the way," says Ubaidur Rob, the Council’s Bangladesh country director, in a new Guardian article by Kenneth Weiss that details the success and scale-up of the Matlab project. 

Media Coverage

Responding to Rana Plaza: A Made-in-Bangladesh Boycott Won’t Help Girls

The collapse of Rana Plaza in Bangladesh a year ago killed more than 1,000 people and injured more than 2,500. Many of those injured and killed were migrant adolescent girls who were employed in a garment factory in the building. The tragedy drew attention to safety issues at Bangladesh garment factories and led some to call for boycotts of clothing made in Bangladesh.

Council researcher Sajeda Amin argues against a boycott, calling it a significant step back for the rights and livelihoods of girls and women, whose lives have been transformed by the opportunity to work. “Earning a wage helps young women prepare for a variety of life scenarios, balancing long-term and short-term goals,” Amin says in a blog on The Guardian’s adolescent girls hub. “Rather than risk the gains made by young women in Bangladesh, which were facilitated in large part by the garment industry, I recommend supporting initiatives that build upon these gains and expand opportunities for girls and young women.”

Media Coverage

Excess Risk of Maternal Mortality in Adolescent Mothers: Less Than Previously Believed?

A recent analysis by Andrea Nove and colleagues in Lancet Global Health is consistent with an analysis by Population Council vice president Ann Blanc and colleagues, both of which found that the excess mortality risk faced by mothers aged 15–19 years might be “less than previously believed.” In a letter to the editor of Lancet Global Health, Blanc reminds the maternal health community that “the evidence for evidence-based policymaking should hold up under scrutiny and that facts are not facts by virtue of frequent repetition.”