Press Releases

Population Council to Present More Than 25 Studies at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America

Research Highlights the Impact of Safe Spaces Initiatives for Improving Girls’ Lives, Strategies for Expanding Access to Family Planning, and a Look at Mortality Projections

NEW YORK (30 April 2014) — The Population Council, an international organization that conducts research to address critical health and development issues, will present findings from more than 25 studies at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America in Boston, MA (1–3 May 2014).

Notable presentations will focus on an assessment of the effects of building girls’ social, health, and economic assets on their risk of sexual harassment in Uganda, the positive impact of reproductive health vouchers in reducing inequalities in labor and delivery care services in Bangladesh, and an analysis of ways to improve projections of mortality in low mortality countries.

The Council will be hosting a panel discussion on the urgent need for better data about migrant girls and women in the developing world, as well as opportunities to meet the editors of the two peer-reviewed journals published by the Council, Population and Development Review and Studies in Family Planning.

"This meeting provides a key opportunity to share ideas, collaborate, and learn from our partners and colleagues studying the implications of population change, including urbanization, family formation, adolescent health, immigration and migration, mortality, and more," said John Bongaarts, PhD, Population Council vice president and Distinguished Scholar and 2013 Laureate for the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population.

A list of notable Council presentations is included below. A full list of Council presentations can be found here


SPECIAL SESSIONS

Thursday, 1 May

10:00–11:00 AM

  • Meet the editors: Join Population and Development Review editors Geoffrey McNicoll and Landis MacKellar and Rachel Friedman, managing editor, for coffee hour at the Population Council booth (no. 113).

2:30–3:30 PM

  • Meet the editors: Join Studies in Family Planning managing editor Gary Bologh for coffee hour at the Population Council booth (no. 113).

7:00–8:30 PM

  • Panel discussion: “Migrant adolescent girls: What we don’t know, what we need to know, and how we can do better” (Sajeda Amin & Mark R. Montgomery, Population Council; Katharine M. Donato, Vanderbilt University; Hillary Margolis, Human Rights Watch; Marta Tienda, Princeton University —Harvard Room, 3rd Floor)

Friday, 2 May

10:00–11:00 AM

  • Meet the editors: Join Studies in Family Planning managing editor Gary Bologh for coffee hour at the Population Council booth (no. 113).

2:30–3:30 PM

  • Meet the editors: Join Population and Development Review editors Geoffrey McNicoll and Landis MacKellar and Rachel Friedman, managing editor, for coffee hour at the Population Council booth (no. 113).
SELECT POPULATION COUNCIL ORAL SESSIONS

Thursday, 1 May

8:30–10:00 AM

  • Session 11: Sexual Behavior, Contraceptive Use, and HIV, “Ambivalence in Pregnancy Intentions: The Effect of Quality of Care and Context among a Cohort of Women Attending Family Planning Clinics in Kenya” (Eliud Wekesa—Tremont, 1st floor)

10:15–11:45 AM

  • Session 22: Strengthening Reproductive Health Programs in Developing Countries, “Role of Voucher Scheme in Reducing Inequalities in the Utilization of Delivery Care Services: Evidence from Rural Bangladesh” (Kaji Tamanna Keya—Salons H-I, 4th floor)

1:00–2:30 PM

  • Session 51: New Insights into the Determinants of Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (Chair: Christine A. Kelly—Vermont, 5th floor), “Myths and Misinformation: An Analysis of Text Messages Sent to a Sexual and Reproductive Health Q&A Service in Nigeria” (Kimberly Glazer—Vermont, 5th floor)

Friday, 2 May

8:30–10:00 AM

  • Session 105: Investments in Children: Implications for Well-Being, “Can Economic Assets Increase Girls’ Risk of Sexual Harassment? Evaluation Results from a Social, Health, and Economic Asset-Building Intervention for Vulnerable Adolescent Girls in Uganda” (Karen Austrian—Tremont, 1st floor)
  • Session 107: Gender and Health, “Women’s Participation in Micro-Finance Programs, "Gender Attitudes and Access to Health and Education in Bangladesh” (Sajeda Amin—Vermont, 5th floor)
  • Session 104: Advances in Methods for Forecasting Mortality, “Trends in Causes of Death in Low Mortality Countries: Implications for Mortality Projections” (John Bongaarts—Suffolk, 3rd floor)
  • Session 107: Gender and Health (Discussant: Stephanie R. Psaki—Vermont, 5th floor)

10:15–11:45 AM

  • Session 114: Fertility and the Demographic Dividend, “FP2020 Goals, Age Structural Changes and Poverty Reduction Strategies in Pakistan” (Muhammad Asif Wazir—Salons A-B, 4th floor)

Saturday, 3 May

9:00–10:30 AM

  • Session 176: Gender and Development, “The Effect of Gender-Related Aspects of School Quality on Schoolgirl Pregnancy in Rural Malawi,” (Stephanie R. Psaki—St. Botolph, 2nd floor)
  • Session 182: STD, HIV, Fertility, and Family Planning (Discussant: Naomi Rutenberg— Wellesley, 3rd floor)

About the Population Council

The Population Council confronts critical health and development issues—from stopping the spread of HIV to improving reproductive health and ensuring that young people lead full and productive lives. Through biomedical, social science, and public health research in 50 countries, we work with our partners to deliver solutions that lead to more effective policies, programs, and technologies that improve lives around the world. Established in 1952 and headquartered in New York, the Council is a nongovernmental, nonprofit organization governed by an international board of trustees.

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Media contact

Gina Duclayan: gduclayan@popcouncil.org; +1 917 538 9555