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Benjamin Bellows

Associate II

Nairobi, Kenya
bbellows@popcouncil.org

Benjamin Bellows is an associate with the Population Council's Reproductive Health program in Nairobi, Kenya. He joined the Council in 2009 to lead a five-country, five-year initiative to measure the impact of reproductive health vouchers on health service uptake, equity, quality of care, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability in East Africa and South and Southeast Asia (2009–14). He is also co-principal investigator on the baseline phase of a GIZ-funded evaluation of subsidized insurance premiums for poor households in a community-based health insurance program in Cambodia (2013–14). He leads a facility-based evaluation of a public-sector performance-based finance (PBF) initiative in northern Kenya (2011–13).

Bellows seeks to use technology to provide health services to people who would not otherwise be reached by the health system. His research is focused on introducing efficiencies in health care financing, developing large health systems that are cost-effective and sustainable, and reaching large numbers of low-income beneficiaries who would otherwise not be served. He is skilled in impact evaluation, multivariable regression modeling, descriptive spatial analysis, and design of results-based finance programs.

Before joining the Population Council, Bellows served as the technical advisor to Venture Strategies for Health and Development, leading the evaluation of a German Development Bank (KfW)–funded voucher program for treatment of sexually transmitted infections (2006–08) in western Uganda.

Bellows is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the board of directors of Friends of Ecuador, a nonprofit organization created by returned Peace Corps volunteers and dedicated to promoting grassroots development in Ecuador.

Bellows received his MPH in epidemiology/biostatistics and social behavior and his PhD in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley, where his research focused on the impact of low-income subsidies for care on population health in East Africa.

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