Expert

Claudia Díaz

Country Director

México D.F., Mexico
cdiaz@popcouncil.org
Claudia Díaz

Claudia Díaz directs the Population Council’s Mexico office, where she supervises a wide portfolio of studies, ranging from measuring the prevalence, sources, and consequences of intimate-partner violence to exploring the prevalence and characteristics of child marriage in Central America and Mexico. Under her leadership, the Mexico office is building evidence that supports women's rights to safe and legal abortion services in Mexico through participation in the National Pro-Choice Alliance.

Her research includes measuring abortion stigma; postabortion contraceptive uptake and continuation among women in Mexico City; and Mexican men's views on abortion and their influence on the reproductive health choices of women. Díaz is affiliated with the Council’s Reproductive Health program.

Díaz has worked with the Council as a staff member or consultant since 1998, and was named director of the Mexico office in January 2013. From 2007 to 2012, she also served as a senior researcher and professor in reproductive health at Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health.

Before entering the reproductive health field, Díaz conducted neuropsychological testing at Mexico’s National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, part of the National Institutes of Health of Mexico. In the course of this work, she observed the health impact of social determinants such as poverty, lack of opportunity, and intimate-partner violence. Her study of the links between intimate-partner violence and abortion led her to focus on reproductive and maternal health.

Díaz has served as a peer reviewer for such journals as the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Salud Pública de México, Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Bulletin of the Pan American Health Organization, and Social Science and Medicine. She is on the board of the Mexico-U.S. Commission on the Fulbright-Garcia Robles Scholarship and the Mexican National Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), where she reviews and makes recommendations on applications for graduate programs in public health in the United States.

She has a master’s degree in clinical psychology and a PhD in health sciences and public health, both from Mexico’s National Autonomous University (UNAM) School of Medicine. She received an award for academic excellence for her doctoral research on the battering syndrome. Díaz also has a certificate in human rights from the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City.

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